Arnold Blackgoat

BlackgoatArnold

Perry Null Trading:

How are things going?

Arnold Blackgoat:

Pretty good, a store on the Plaza in Santa Fe has put my work in it’s own showcase.

Perry Null Trading:

That’s great, makes you feel good. It seems like you have lots of family members that makes silver, give me a quick family tree?

Arnold Blackgoat:

My great grandfather is Moses Blackgoat, he was the first in my family to make silver jewelry. He was from the Lupton area and started around the early 1900s. He passed on the trade to my grandparents, Ben & Helen Blackgoat. They taught my father Harrison, and my mother Jennie also picked up the trade. Now I am the fourth generation in my family to make silver.

Perry Null Trading:

How about Susie James, is she related to you?

Arnold Blackgoat:

Susie is my mother’s sister. My mom and dad taught her and other family how to make jewelry so they could have a living.

Perry Null Trading:

Are you related to Carson Blackgoat?

Arnold Blackgoat:

Yes, he’s my uncle, my father’s brother, and Irene Lee is my aunt. Irene explained to me how to do shadow box work and I will sometimes make pieces in this style.

Perry Null Trading:

When did you make your first piece of jewelry?

Arnold Blackgoat:

I was with my grandma at the Shiprock Fair. I wanted some money for something at the fair. She tossed me a piece of nickel and told me to make something, that is how I could earn the money to buy what I wanted. I made a stamped buckle and bolo that I sold at the fair.

Perry Null Trading:

How old were you and what year was this?

Arnold Blackgoat:

I was around 10 years old, that would have been around 1980.

Perry Null Trading:

Did you continue making jewelry?

Arnold Blackgoat:

Yes, the next week at the Tuba City Fair and then through mid school and high school. My grandma taught me the value of making my own money and that is what I did.

Perry Null Trading:

How much would you make during your school years?

Arnold Blackgoat:

I don’t know. My parents wanted to buy a new truck and I was able to buy their old truck for $1000 cash during high school, that is when I knew I was making some money.

Perry Null Trading:

What kind of jewelry were you making?

Arnold Blackgoat:

I had a buyer that would pay me $400 for a concho belt, it was a big one. That would last me a month or so, and then I would make another. He always bought the belt. Also, silver was around $4 an ounce then, so it is not like now. Today that belt would be over $1000.

Perry Null Trading:

Your work, was it similar to your parents?

Arnold Blackgoat:

Yes, it was until about 8 years ago. That is when I started to change my style.

Perry Null Trading:

What did you do different?

Arnold Blackgoat:

My mother’s work as always has been my inspiration. She always used lots of stamp work and would make each piece a little different. That was my foundation and I just made small changes to the work. I would add extra beads, wire work, homemade bezel, and use better turquoise. Concentrating on making one of a kind pieces.

Perry Null Trading:

Who’s work do you admire?

Arnold Blackgoat:

I always enjoy looking at Calvin Martinez, Irene Lee, and Carson Blackgoat’s work.

Perry Null Trading:

What does your mom say about your jewelry?

Arnold Blackgoat:

My grandma always told me that I would be a nice artist, I remember that. When I show my mom, aunts, and uncles my work they always tell me how much better it is when they were my age.

Perry Null Trading:

Have you ever won any awards?

Arnold Blackgoat:

At the Shiprock and Tuba City Fairs.

Perry Null Trading:

We look forward to having more of your work here at the Trading Post, thank you.

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