Kathryn Begay, Yei' Rug, Navajo Handwoven, Red, Black, Gray, 45" x 29"

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$1,370.00
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$1,370.00
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Kathryn Begay, Yei' Rug, Navajo Handwoven, Red, Black, Gray, 45" x 29"
Kathryn Begay, Yei' Rug, Navajo Handwoven, Red, Black, Gray, 45" x 29"
Kathryn Begay, Yei' Rug, Navajo Handwoven, Red, Black, Gray, 45" x 29"
Kathryn Begay, Yei' Rug, Navajo Handwoven, Red, Black, Gray, 45" x 29"
Kathryn Begay, Yei' Rug, Navajo Handwoven, Red, Black, Gray, 45" x 29"
ArtistBegay, Kathryn
General Height29
Width45
Rug Dye TypeAniline Dye (commercial wool)
Rug HandspunNo
Rug MaterialWool
Rug Navajo PatternYei
Rug Patterngeometric-pattern
Rug Size2-footx3-foot
Rug Time PeriodModern (Post 1950)
TribeNavajo
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Before the trains started coming to this part of the world and businesses like the Fred Harvey Company started selling Navajo jewelry to the masses, most people back east didn't know anything of the Navajo. Traders like JB Moore would be one of the first to introduce the art of the Navajo to collectors back east, rugs not silver. He put together a catalog of different weavings that would be sold in large quantities. More Traders would begin to introduce Navajo weavings and even influence certain styles. Today this tradition is carried on by the Trading Posts. We have a large collection of weavings from classic Ganado Reds to Germantown Revivals. Also, old antiques that have the character that goes with age to the new contemporary weavings. Enjoy looking through our online collection, and remember if you don't see what you are looking for we have many more in the Post.

It is generally acknowledged that the earliest commercial Yei rugs appeared around the turn of the century near Farmington, NM. Englishman Dick Simpson, founder of the Gallegos Canyon Trading Post in 1896, was the first to showcase a large, single figure Yei rug. In fact, it was his Navajo wife Ya-na-pah and her older sister Gle-nup-pah, who are credited with weaving some of the finest early Yei rugs. Despite the Navajo prohibition of putting sacred figures into a permanent medium (sandpaintings are always destroyed after a healing ceremony), the commercial success of these Gallegos ÒblanketsÓ may have encouraged other weavers to imitate them. ÒBlankets with a central figureÉprobably began to appear as early as 1910.Ó (Valette:1997)In the early 1900Õs, respected medicine man and weaver, Hosteen Klah, with the support of Boston socialite, Mary Wheelwright, and trading post owner, Franc Newcomb, broke through all boundaries by weaving both Yei and sacred sandpainting designs. In 1911 Klah is said to have woven ÒÉa set of Yeibichai dancers, which he sold to Mr. Ed Davies for several sheep.Ó (Newcomb:1964) In a photograph of the Newcomb Trading Post booth at the 1914 Shiprock Fair, a large Yei rug hangs alongside a Whirling Log sandpainting textile. (Newcomb:1966) Both were probably woven by Klah.