Rose Gorman, Circular Eye Dazzler Rug, Turquoise Blue, Navajo Handwoven, 22 in

Regular price
$395.00
Sale price
$395.00
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per 
Rose Gorman, Circular Eye Dazzler Rug, Turquoise Blue, Navajo Handwoven, 22 in
Rose Gorman, Circular Eye Dazzler Rug, Turquoise Blue, Navajo Handwoven, 22 in
Rose Gorman, Circular Eye Dazzler Rug, Turquoise Blue, Navajo Handwoven, 22 in
AgeCirca 2010's
ArtistGorman, Rose
Bracelet Gapn/a
Widest Point on Bracelet Bandn/a
General Height22
Setting Typeinvisible
Width22
One of a KindTRUE
Rug Dye TypeAniline Dye (commercial wool)
Rug HandspunNo
Rug MaterialWool
Rug Navajo PatternMulti-Pattern
Rug Patterngeometric-pattern
Rug Size2-footx3-foot
Rug Time PeriodModern (Post 1950)
Rug Warp8
Rug Weft46
SignedSigned
Style48
TribeNavajo
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Traders like JB Moore would be the first to introduce the art of the Navajo to collectors back east, but it was rugs (not silver) that first captured the imaginations collectors and decorators. Following Moore's suit, other traders would begin to market Navajo weaving, even influencing many of the well-known styles. Today styles are not defined by regions, but perfected by dedicated weavers from all parts of the Navajo Nations. We have put together a large collection of rugs on our online Trading Post and hope you take time to look through them all. Hopefully, you will find the perfect rug.Navajo weaver Marie Yazzie made this gorgeous New Lands rug. This is a newer style that comes from the New Lands area near Sanders, AZ. It draws from a few different styles, but the raised weave is definitely its own. Like many other patterns this one has evolved over the years and comes in many different colors and patterns. Trader Bruce Burnham is credited with its development.
 

Navajo Weaving

The main Navajo weaving technique is classified as weft-faced tapestry. In this method discontinuous horizontal wefts go over and under vertical warps, completely concealing the warp threads.

Warp and weft are important because their coarseness or fineness, along with the skill of a weaver, determine the tightness of a weave. “Tightness” is what differentiates a loosely woven throw, a quality floor rug or museum tapestry. Tightness is defined by the number of weft threads per linear inch. The higher the weft counts, the tighter, finer and more expensive Navajo textiles will be.

You’ll find the lowest weft counts in coarsely woven Gallup Throws, approximately 12-16 threads per inch and the highest, 80-120, in superior Two Grey Hills/Toadlena weaves. The vast majority of Navajo textiles fall somewhere in between. These mid-range weavings have average counts of 30-60 wefts per inch. Textiles in this group are considered well woven, reasonably tight and ably crafted for long lasting wear and beauty.

To determine the weft count of a textile, place a ruler parallel to a vertical warp. With the aid of a magnifying glass count the number of weft threads in one inch. (Double that number to take into account the corresponding wefts on the back face.) Repeat this process in a number of areas since weft counts may vary with the different yarns in a pattern. Average the counts when you’re through. This gives you a good assessment of your piece.

Be aware that the tighter a weaver pounds down the wefts with her comb, and the finer her wool is spun, the higher the weft count will be. Keep in mind too, that the ratio between warp and weft is also important, with the finest textiles having both high warp and weft counts.