Millie White, Eye Dazzler, Navajo Rug, Black, Red, Gray, Handwoven, 41" x 51"

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$355.00
Sale price
$355.00
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per 
Millie White, Eye Dazzler, Navajo Rug, Black, Red, Gray, Handwoven, 41" x 51"
Millie White, Eye Dazzler, Navajo Rug, Black, Red, Gray, Handwoven, 41" x 51"
Millie White, Eye Dazzler, Navajo Rug, Black, Red, Gray, Handwoven, 41" x 51"
Millie White, Eye Dazzler, Navajo Rug, Black, Red, Gray, Handwoven, 41" x 51"
ArtistWhite, Millie
General Height51
Width41
Rug Dye TypeAniline Dye (commercial wool)
Rug HandspunNo
Rug MaterialWool
Rug Navajo PatternEye Dazzler
Rug Patterngeometric-pattern
Rug Size2-footx3-foot
Rug Time PeriodModern (Post 1950)
TribeNavajo
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Before the trains started coming to this part of the world and businesses like the Fred Harvey Company started selling Navajo jewelry to the masses, most people back east didn't know anything of the Navajo. Traders like JB Moore would be one of the first to introduce the art of the Navajo to collectors back east, rugs not silver. He put together a catalog of different weavings that would be sold in large quantities. More Traders would begin to introduce Navajo weavings and even influence certain styles. Today this tradition is carried on by the Trading Posts. We have a large collection of weavings from classic Ganado Reds to Germantown Revivals. Also, old antiques that have the character that goes with age to the new contemporary weavings. Enjoy looking through our online collection, and remember if you don't see what you are looking for we have many more in the Post.

Beyond the similarity in tradition and technique, however, various regions throughout the Reservation have created their own distinctive rug styles. Two Grey Hills rugs are prized for their fine tapestry weaves in natural shades of grey, black, cream and brown. Ganado Red rugs are sought for their boldness of color and geometric design. Lorenzo Hubbell introduced the vibrant red aniline dye at his Ganado Trading Post in the late 1800's. Wide Ruins and Burntwater rugs are outstanding examples of finely spun, vegetal dyed wool in intricate and interlocking patterns. Sage, rabbit brush, wild onion, parsley, wildflowers and numerous root stocks provide the source for the soft rainbow of colors.The Yei and Yei Bi Chei rugs of the Shiprock and Lukachukai areas are colorful weavings representing spiritual deities and the Yei Bi Chei dancers of the winter Nightway Ceremony. Other rug styles include Klagetoh, modern Crystal, saddle blankets, Tree of Life and the Chief rug with its wide bands of red, white and indigo blue.